Socialist Review: an Appeal

 

SR AppealDear Friends

John Key and National have further attacks on workers and the poor planned for 2014. Changes to labour laws will leave workers vulnerable to further intimidation and exploitation by their bosses, and weaken the ability of our unions to stand up for our rights. Environmental degradation – all in the name of profits for the rich – comes as exploration for deep sea oil drilling goes on protected by anti-protest legislation. Beneficiaries face further harassment.

But cracks are showing in Key’s government. ACT is now a party of the walking dead; the polls show National’s lead starting to slip; mass stop-work rallies last year showed the potential to beat back the bosses on the industrial front. Protest action – from the marches against asset sales to the taxi drivers’ victory with First union at the end of 2013 – show that there is resistance out there, and that it can win.

Socialist Review wants to be a part of this resistance, reporting on the struggles taking place across the country and offering arguments and analysis in the movements against National. We’re a pro-worker, pro-union, socialist publication. We’re produced by activists who support the Mana movement, and who are arguing for anti-capitalist politics in their workplaces, communities and campuses. We don’t just report, however; Socialist Review makes the case for revolutionary socialism, for clear-cut Marxist politics, for the need for a socialist alternative to capitalism and war. We think these ideas are essential for our side.

For a dozen years now the magazine has been produced quarterly. In the last two years our web presence has supplemented our print production, allowing us to print dozens of articles responding to immediate events. But we need to grow to be more effective – we want to produce Socialist Review more regularly, aiming to get it out 8 times a year, and we want to make it a more professional publication.

To achieve this, we need your support. To improve the magazine and modernise its production, we’re trying to raise $3 000 by June this year. Every donation will help get out more arguments for socialism; more arguments against National; more magazines backing the movements and campaigns from below.

Please donate to help our appeal. You can make cheques out to “ISO – Wellington” and send them to Socialist Review, PO Box 7513, Newtown, Wellington, or make a bank transfer directly to BNZ 02-0536-0456903-001

In solidarity,

Dougal McNeill

For the Socialist Review editorial collective

Trackbacks

  1. […] Saturday, June 14, 7pm, Newtown Community Centre, Wellington Marx in Soho A play by Howard Zinn, performed by Anya Tate-Manning. This is the New Zealand premier of this amazing play. Marx is back! The premise of this witty and insightful “play on history” is that Karl Marx has agitated with the authorities of the afterlife for a chance to clear his name. Through a bureaucratic error, though, Marx is sent to Soho in New York, rather than his old stomping ground in London, to make his case. Howard Zinn, best known for his book, ‘A Peoples History of the United States’, introduces us to Marx’s wife, Jenny, his children, the anarchist Mikhail Bakunin, and a host of other characters. Marx in Soho is a brilliant introduction to Marx’s life, his analysis of society, and his passion for radical change. Zinn also shows how Marx’s ideas are relevant in today’s world. This is a fundraising event for the ISO to improve the Socialist Review. For more information about the Socialist Review appeal, see our appeal page. […]

  2. […] Saturday, June 14, 7pm, Newtown Community Centre, WellingtonMarx in Soho A play by Howard Zinn, performed by Anya Tate-Manning. This is the New Zealand premier of this amazing play. Marx is back! The premise of this witty and insightful “play on history” is that Karl Marx has agitated with the authorities of the afterlife for a chance to clear his name. Through a bureaucratic error, though, Marx is sent to Soho in New York, rather than his old stomping ground in London, to make his case. Howard Zinn, best known for his book, ‘A Peoples History of the United States’, introduces us to Marx’s wife, Jenny, his children, the anarchist Mikhail Bakunin, and a host of other characters. Marx in Soho is a brilliant introduction to Marx’s life, his analysis of society, and his passion for radical change. Zinn also shows how Marx’s ideas are relevant in today’s world. This is a fundraising event for the ISO to improve the Socialist Review. For more information about the Socialist Review appeal, see our appeal page. […]

  3. […] Saturday, June 14, 7pm, Newtown Community Centre, WellingtonMarx in Soho A play by Howard Zinn, performed by Anya Tate-Manning. This is the New Zealand premier of this amazing play. Marx is back! The premise of this witty and insightful “play on history” is that Karl Marx has agitated with the authorities of the afterlife for a chance to clear his name. Through a bureaucratic error, though, Marx is sent to Soho in New York, rather than his old stomping ground in London, to make his case. Howard Zinn, best known for his book, ‘A Peoples History of the United States’, introduces us to Marx’s wife, Jenny, his children, the anarchist Mikhail Bakunin, and a host of other characters. Marx in Soho is a brilliant introduction to Marx’s life, his analysis of society, and his passion for radical change. Zinn also shows how Marx’s ideas are relevant in today’s world. This is a fundraising event for the ISO to improve the Socialist Review. For more information about the Socialist Review appeal, see our appeal page. […]

  4. […] This is a fundraising event for the ISO to improve the Socialist Review. For more information about the Socialist Review appeal, see our appeal page. […]

  5. […] This is a fundraising event for the ISO to improve the Socialist Review. For more information about the Socialist Review appeal, see our appeal page. […]

  6. […] This is a fundraising event for the ISO to improve the Socialist Review. For more information about the Socialist Review appeal, see our appeal page. […]

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